Category Archives: Announcements

Look at us now!

Building Technology is one way to date a building. Visit our site to learn how we do it!

Building Technology is one way to date a building. Visit our site to learn how we do it!

We’re sad to see it go, but we have a completely new website which has been designed just for you! Loaded with new content, our side aims to not only be a place where you can see what we have done; now, it is also a resource for historic homeowners and history enthusiasts who are looking to learn more about their building.

Salem Witch house

Front of the Salem Witch House. This building is the only structure remaining from the days of the Witch Trials.

Front of the Salem Witch House. This building is the only structure remaining from the days of the Witch Trials.

The Salem Witch House was constructed in the 1670′s for Judge William Hathorne. He presided over the notorious Witch Trials in Salem. He is also a relative of author Nathaniel Hawthorne who was born across town.

Now a museum, the Salem Witch House needed to be sensitively adapted to accommodate those with disabilities. Working with B. Goba and Associates, P.C., our firm documented the building’s ground floor and provided assistance with the preparation of contract documents. We specifically were responsible for the creation of drawings and details necessary for the contractor to build the project. We also provided assistance with the reviews by the local and state historical commissions, and Massachusetts Architectural Access Board.

The final project was constructed in two phases. An exterior graded walk was constructed on the outside rear. The second half involved widening the existing rear door, removal of select walls, and widening of interior openings to accommodate wheelchairs.

Isaac Royall House

Constructed circa 1732, the Royall House is a great representation of early Georgian Architecture in the American Colonies.

Constructed circa 1732, the Royall House is a great representation of early Georgian Architecture in the American Colonies.

The Preservation Collaborative recently completed as-built documentation for the Isaac Royall House. Built circa 1732, this mansion house was home to wealthy sugar plantation owner Isaac Royall. He died two years after arriving in 1738, leaving the estate to his son, Isaac Royall Jr., who resided here with his family until the eve of the American Revolution.

This building is well known in New England for one of the last freestanding slave quarter structures north of the Mason-Dixon Line. It is a reminder of northern slavery, a study which has been gaining ground for quite some time. An archaeological dig was conducted in the 2000′s, along with several new scholarly books being published which focus on the house and occupants from the seventeenth through nineteenth centuries.

Our work involved documenting the floor plans and elevations of the existing building for future study of the building’s history. You can learn more about the Royall House and its exciting history here: http://www.royallhouse.org/

Shepherd Brooks Estate

Image of the Brooks Estate as it appears today!

Image of the Brooks Estate as it appears today!

The Preservation Collaborative spent the summer, fall and winter months extensively documenting the Shepherd Brooks Estate manor house. Work included documenting the 21 room building on three floors, plus full basement and exterior elevations.You can read more about the Brooks Estate restoration here: http://www.brooksestate.org/